USS Newport - History

USS Newport - History

Newport
(PG-12: dp. 1,153; 1. 204'5"; b. 36'; dr. 12'9"; s. 12.8 k.;
cpl. 156; a. 1 4", 2 3", 2 6-pdr.)

The first Newport (PG-12) was laid down by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Me., March 1896; launched 5 December 1896; sponsored by Miss Frances La Farge; and commissioned 5 October 1897, Comdr. B. F. Tilley in command.

After fitting out in Boston, Newport sailed for duty in the Caribbean 15 October 1897. Between December 1897 and August 1898, the ship patrolled off the West Indies and Central America. During the Spanish-Ameriean War, she received credit for assisting in the capture of nine Spanish vessels. The ship returned to the United States and decommissioned 7 September 1898.

Recommissioned 1 May 1900, Newport served as training ship at the Naval Academy and at the Naval Training Station at Newport, R. I., until decommissioning at Boston 1 December 1902.

Recommissioned 18 May 1903, she operated with the Atlantic Fleet along the eastern seaboard and in the West Indies until decommissioned 17 November 1906. Newport was loaned to the Massachusetts Naval Militia 2 June 1907 and on 27 October 1907 was reassigned to the New York Publix Marine Sehool. She also served as training ship for the 3rd Naval District until June 1918, when she was returned to the Navy for wartime service. On 26 July 1918 she was reassigned to continue duty as a New York State training ship under control of Commandant, 3rd Naval District. The gunboat sailed on a training cruise from New York to the Gulf of Mexico and the West Indies from 9 December 1918 to 25 May 1919. On 3 June 1919, she returned to full control of New York State. She was redesignated IX-19 on 1 July 1921.

Struck from the Navy List 12 October 1931, she was turned over to the eity of Aberdeen, Wash., by Act of Congress 14 May 1934, to be used as a training ship for Naval Reserves.


'Refueling DD-710 In The Med'

USS Newport News (CA-148), February 1951. Combined US-British Exercises in the Mediterranean. USS Gearing (DD 710) fueling from Sixth Fleet Flagship USS Newport News (CA-148) during combined U.S. and British Naval Exercises February 12-13, 1952, in the Mediterranean. Also at National Archives as USN 708112. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. (2015/06/30)

Nov. 2019
Bob Freeman, myself, and Herb Bernard are representing the USS Newport News at the dedication of the new plaque describing the anchor that is featured in the middle of the rotary just in front of the old entrance to the USS Salem in Quincy, Mass.
The event was attended by crew members from all three Des Moines class Cruisers including Newport News, Des Moines,, and the Salem.
We also had some foreign dignitaries from Villefranche Sur Mer, the Mediterranean Home Port of all three of these vessels when they operated in the med in the 50s and 60s as Com 6th Fleet. The folks from the town of Villefranche are creating a museum to honor the vessels that were stationed there as their home port, and this international meeting opens up a new channel of communications with those in the med who are interested in preserving both the ship and the history of the world's largest and greatest heavy gun cruisers.
The mayor of Quincy was in attendance, along with several state politicians, and 4 motorcycle cops donated their time to handle traffic around the Rotary while 50 or 60 people were inside the circle having the ceremony.
The anchor itself came from the USS Des Moines before it was scrapped, and the $3,000 cost of the 60 lb. bronze plaques was borne by a Des Moines sailor. After the anchor ceremony, we all went to the Salem and dedicated a plaque on the side of the superstructure.


USS Newport - History

Newport News II
(CA-148: dp. 20,980 1. 717'6" b. 76'6" dr. 27' s. 31.5k cpl. 1,667 a. 9 8", 12 5", 12 3" cl. Des Moines)

The second Newport News (CA-148), a heavy cruiser, was laid down 1 November 1945 launched on 6 March 1948 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Newport News, Virginia sponsored by Mrs. Homer T. Ferguson, commissioned 29 January 1949, Captain Roland N. Smoot commanding.

In addition to annual deployments to the Mediterranean from 1950 to 1961 for duty with the Sixth Fleet, she participated in major fleet exercises and midshipman training cruises in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic. In early September 1957, Newport News was on station in the Eastern Mediterranean in preparation for any contingency during the Syrian crisis. In March 1960, while steaming 75 miles northeast of Sicily, Newport News was ordered to proceed to Agadir, Moroceo, to render assistance to the survivors of that earthquake shattered city. She steamed 1,225 miles in 40.5 hours at an average speed of 31 knots, arriving on 3 March to provide medical and material aid. With the assassination of General Trujillo and the resulting instability in Santo Domingo, Newport News was underway on short notice on 4 June 1961, and proceeded to a station in international waters off the Dominican Republic to await further orders. When the crisis terminated, the ship returned to Norfolk after conducting training exercises off Puerto Rico.

Newport News' berthing and communications facilities were mod)fied in the winter of 1962 to aceomodate Commander

Second Fleet and his staff. In August 1962, she participated in NATO Exereise RIPTIDE III, and upon the end of the exercise, made a month long tour of Northern European ports as flagship of ComStrikFltLant, the NATO role of Commander Second Fleet.

Within a month after return to Norfolk, Newport News was underway on 22 October along with other units of the Atlantic Fleet for the Cuban Quarantinc. For the next mobth acting as flagship for ComSecondFlt, CA-148 was on station northeast of Cuba. When the Soviet MRBM's were dismantled and removed from Cuba, Newport News assisted in the missile count. Upon cancellation of the quarantine, she returned to her homeport of Norfolk the day before Thanksgiving.

Operations from 1963 through 1967 consisted primarily of NATO exercises in the North Atlantic, gunnery and amphibious exercises off the Eastern seaboard and Caribbean, and midshipman cruises. When the Dominican Republic crisis of 1965 developed, Newport News sortied from Norfolk on 29 April for Santo Domingo, where she was flagship for Commander Joint Task Force 122. Newport News remained on station off Santo Domingo until 7 May 1965 when JTF 122 was dissolved, and command was shifted to the Army ashore in the Dominican Republic. She returned to Norfolk, where in June alterations were made to increase her combat eapabilities.

1 September 1967, Commander Second Fleet shifted his flag to Springfield, and Newport News departed Norfolk 5 September for a six month deployment to South East Asia. Arriving Da Nang, South Vietnam, on the morning of 9 October, she became thc flagship of ComCruDesFlot 3. That night, at 2300, she fired her eight inch rifles for the first time in anger against shore targets in North Vietnam as part of "operation Sea Dragon". For years her powerful guns had served as a major force to keep the peace. Now her strength
served well in war during the following months in providing interdiction fire north of the Demilitarized Zone and naval gunfire support for American allied troops in South Vietnam.

The cruiser departed Subic Bay 21 April and arrived at her homeport of Norfolk 13 May 1968, via the Panama Canal.


SSN 750 - U SS Newport News


Norfolk, Virginia - November 2011


Norfolk, Virginia - September 2011


Bay of Naples, Italy - March 2011


Atlantic Ocean - January 2011


Norfolk, Virginia - January 2011


Norfolk, Virginia - January 2011


Navy junior ROTC students aboard USS Newport News - Norfolk, Virginia - November 2010


Norfolk, Virginia - October 2010


Port Everglades, Florida - April 2010


April 2010


April 2010


Norfolk, Virginia - October 2009


torpedo room - Norfolk, Virginia - October 2008


Mk-48 ADCAP torpedo onload - Norfolk, Virginia - October 2008


Norfolk, Virginia - October 2008


Norfolk, Virginia - September 11, 2008


August 2008


August 2008


June 2008


Norfolk, Virginia - April 2008


Norfolk, Virginia - April 2007


Norfolk, Virginia - April 2007


Norfolk, Virginia - October 2006


Norfolk, Virginia - October 2006


Norfolk, Virginia - September 2005


Norfolk, Virginia - February 2005


Souda Bay, Crete, Greece - October 2004


Souda Bay, Crete, Greece - October 2004


Souda Bay, Crete, Greece - October 2004


Souda Bay, Crete, Greece - October 2004


1995


1995


1995


1995


1995


1995


commissioning ceremony - June 3, 1989


commissioning ceremony - June 3, 1989


commissioning ceremony - June 3, 1989


1989


trials - 1989


1989


1989


1989


1989


1989


1989


1989


launching ceremony - March 15, 1986


launching ceremony - March 15, 1986


launching ceremony - March 15, 1986


launching ceremony - March 15, 1986


launching ceremony - March 15, 1986


launching ceremony - March 15, 1986


keel laying ceremony - March 3, 1984

The third Newport News (SSN-750) was laid down on 3 March 1984 at Newport News, Va., by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. launched on 15 March 1986 sponsored by Mrs. Rosemary D. Trible, wife of Senator Paul S. Trible Jr., Virginia and was commissioned on 3 June 1989 at Naval Station (NS) Norfolk, Va., Cmdr. Mark B. Keef in command.

Newport News, Cmdr. Frederick J. Capria in command, deployed for Operation Iraqi Freedom I and on 21 and 22 March 2003, she joined 29 other U.S. and British ships and submarines that fired Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAMs) against Iraqi military targets. On 3 December 2003, Capria received the Bronze Star for his command of the attack boat during these battles.

“The Submarine Force brings stealth, endurance, agility, and firepower to the battlefield, and these three units are shining examples of those characteristics,” Vice Adm. Kirkland H. Donald, Commander Naval Submarine Forces explained. “The success of these submarines is the direct result of the superior leadership skills of the three commanding officers before you today," he continued. "These skills, coupled with the ability to make tough decisions that only commanding officers must make, are the reasons we are here today.”

“It’s actually very rewarding, not so much the recognition for me, but the recognition for the ship,” Capria added. “After an extensive shipyard period in 2002, the crew quickly transformed Newport News from an industrial environment to a front-line warrior.”

Newport News, Cmdr. Matthew A. Weingart in command, collided with Japanese-flagged Mogamigawa, a 299,999-ton tanker operated by Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha, Ltd., while Newport News passed submerged southbound through the Strait of Hormuz at about 2215 on 8 January 2008. Neither vessel reported any casualties, but the impact damaged the submarine’s forward ballast tanks and lightly damaged one of the merchantman’s four forward screws and a ballasting tank. Mogamigawa continued under her own power to a nearby port in the United Arab Emirates and subsequently accomplished repairs. Newport News came about and returned to her previous port of call, Mina Salman, Bahrain, where she conducted an initial damage assessment and completed temporary repairs to the ballast tanks. Shortly after the collision, Capt. Norman B. Moore relieved Cmdr. Weingart as commanding officer. Capt. Daniel P. Forney relieved Capt. Moore on 18 January, and on 12 February, Cmdr. David W. Alldridge relieved Capt. Forney. Newport News returned to Norfolk on 24 April.

source: US Naval History & Heritage Command

Newport News returned to Norfolk, Virginia, following a six-month overseas deployment that included operations in the Middle East. In support of Operation Iraqi Freedom she launched 19 UGM-109C Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles in March 2003. She deployed in August 2004, first to take part in joint operations with allied navies in the North Atlantic, then to the U.S. Central Command area of operations "in support of national security interests and the global war on terrorism."


Collision with Japanese ship

On 8 January 2007, Newport News was operating submerged in the Arabian Sea south of the Straits of Hormuz when it hit the Japanese tanker Mogamigawa. She had been operating as part of Carrier Strike Group 8 (CSG-8), organized around the aircraft carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). The Carrier Strike Group was redeploying to the Indian Ocean to support a maritime cordon during the war in Somalia when the incident happened. The Newport News suffered damage to her bow, but there was no damage to the sail, mast or reactor, and she made for port in Bahrain under her own power. Newport News was escorted from the mouth of the Straits of Hormuz to Bahrain by the Guided Missile Destroyer USS Benfold. This was due to the fact that the submarine was unable to transit submerged and has no surface defense capabilities. During the transit, Iranian aircraft and warships shadowed the ships. An official of the Kawasaki Kisen Company (or K Line), which owns the tanker, announced that Mogamigawa‍ '​s hull and propellers were damaged.

According to a Navy spokesman, the collision occurred as a result of the venturi effect. The tanker drove over the area where the submarine was submerged and this created a sucking effect that forced the submarine upward to the surface. The incident was the third collision between a U.S. nuclear-powered submarine and a Japanese civilian ship.

On 29 January, after the boat returned to Bahrain for repairs, administrative personnel actions (Admiral's Mast) were taken against several members of her crew, which included relieving the boat's commanding officer, Commander Matthew A. Weingart, of command due to a lack of confidence in his ability to command.


USS Newport - History

USS Newport News , a 3537 gross ton (approximately 10,000 tons displacement) cargo ship, was built at Flensburg, Germany, in 1904 as the Danish freighter St. Jan . The German Hamburg-Amerika line bought her in 1907 and renamed her Odenwald . A few days after World War I began in August 1914 she helped the German cruiser Karlsruhe embark 550 tons of coal and some reservists while in port at San Juan, Puerto Rico. In March 1915 Odenwald attempted to depart San Juan without clearance papers, probably to provide coal and supplies to the raider Kronprinz Wilhelm (later USS Von Steuben ), but was driven back to her anchorage by gunfire from the Morro Castle. Seized when the United States entered World War I in April 1917, she was turned over to the Navy a month later. The ship was renamed Newport News in June, refitted at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and placed in commission in July 1917.

Newport News entered service as a transatlantic cargo carrier and was assigned to the Naval Overseas Transportation Service (NOTS) when it was was established in January 1918. Detached from NOTS in June 1919, she immediately proceeding to the Pacific, where she carried out supply voyages, primarily to the Far East. Newport News was classified as a cargo ship (AK-3) when hull numbers were first assigned to Navy ships in July 1920. In 1921 her authorized passenger capacity was set at four first-class passengers and 125 troops. USS Newport News was decommissioned at Puget Sound, Washington and stricken from the Navy List in August 1924. Sold in 1925, she became the merchant ship Arctic and was scrapped in 1937.

This page features all the views we have concerning USS Newport News and S.S. Odenwald .

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USS Newport News (1917-1925)

At the Philadelphia Navy Yard in June 1918. This ship, formerly the German Odenwald , was seized in 1917. She was classified AK-3 in 1920.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 65KB 740 x 510 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

USS Newport News (1917-1925, later AK-3)

Photographed in San Francisco Bay, California, circa 1919.
The ship served in the Pacific from August 1919 until she was decommissioned in August 1924.

Courtesy Donald M. McPherson, 1976.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 62KB 740 x 485 pixels

Waiting off Wake Island on 24 September 1922, prior to putting ashore a large cache of fresh water and provisions for use in the event of a ship wreck there.
This mission occurred during a period in which few ships passed Wake Island.

Received from the U.S. Naval Library, Treasure Island Naval Station, California, 1969.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 63KB 740 x 485 pixels

USS Newport News (AK-3), with
USS Undaunted (AT-58) alongside

Probably in San Francisco Bay, California, circa the early 1920s.

Photograph was received from the Office of Naval Intelligence, 1936.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 53KB 740 x 445 pixels

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Page made 12 October 2008
Text edited and coding updated 13 January 2009


USS Newport News (CA-148) - 1963–1974

Operations from 1963 through 1967 consisted primarily of NATO exercises in the North Atlantic, gunnery and amphibious exercises off the Eastern seaboard and Caribbean, and midshipman cruises. When the Dominican Republic crisis of 1965 developed, Newport News sortied from Norfolk on 29 April for Santo Domingo, where she was flagship for Commander Joint Task Force 122. Newport News remained on station off Santo Domingo until 7 May 1965 when JTF 122 was dissolved, and command was shifted to the Army ashore in the Dominican Republic. She returned to Norfolk, where in June alterations were made to increase her combat capabilities. On June 28, 1965, Newport News entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Va. for a five month period of refitting and overhaul, a regular part of the life cycle of a warship. Shakedown was in Guantanamo, Cuba, over Christmas and New Year of 1965. It was no picnic, as those who were there can attest to. "Combat ready" was a way of life, sometimes more than 10 hours at a time. Swimming, softball, and drinking were the favorite pastimes. Upon her return from Gitmo, Newport News once again became Flagship for Second Fleet, Vice Admiral Masterson taking command.

1 September 1967, Commander Second Fleet shifted his flag to Springfield, and Newport News departed Norfolk 5 September for a six month deployment to Southeast Asia. Arriving Da Nang, South Vietnam, on the morning of 9 October, she became the flagship of ComCruDesFlot 3. That night, at 2300, under her new call sign "Thunder," she fired her eight inch rifles for the first time in anger against shore targets in North Vietnam as part of Operation Sea Dragon.

Newport News spent some 50 days patrolling the coast of North Vietnam as part of Operation Sea Dragon – the Navy’s effort to destroy waterborne logistics craft as well as military supply routes ashore in North Vietnam. During this period, the ship conducted 156 strikes against enemy targets and, in the execution of these strikes, 325 North Vietnamese coastal defense sites were taken under fire. Combined, 7411 rounds of high explosive ammunition were expended by the ship during Operation Sea Dragon. According to spotters’ reports, Newport News sank 17 waterborne logistics craft, damaged another 14 and destroyed several enemy bunker and radar sites. In harassment and interdiction strike missions she all but halted the enemy’s rebuilding efforts as she damaged bridges, barges, trucks and roads and caused heavy ruin and raging fires in widespread areas. The ship was subjected to hostile fire on several occasions, but each time countered effectively and silenced the enemy batteries. On 19 December 1967, Newport News exchanged fire with 20–28 separate shore batteries, simultaneously, off the coast of North Vietnam. During the short period of this engagement, over 300 enemy rounds bracketed the cruiser’s position, but ship handling by Captain McCarty prevented any direct hits. This encounter led American forward observers to nickname Newport News “The Gray Ghost from the East Coast,” a moniker she retained throughout her three Vietnam deployments.

Subsequent to the end of Operation Sea Dragon and for the remaining several months of this deployment, Newport News participated in Naval Gunfire Support operations near the DMZ (The Demilitarized Zone). In support of Third Marine Division forces on the beach, the ship fired around the clock for periods sometimes lasting several weeks in succession. On station near the DMZ, Newport News was normally in sight of land and crewmembers could frequently see and hear, first hand, the effect of their efforts on enemy positions.

During the total period of this deployment, Newport News expended a record 59,241 rounds of high-explosive ammunition, while conducting a total of 239 observed and 602 unobserved missions against the enemy. She came under fire of enemy coastal defense batteries on seventeen separate occasions, was frequently straffed with shrapnel, but never suffering a direct hit.

The cruiser departed Subic Bay on 21 April and arrived at her homeport of Norfolk, Virginia on 13 May 1968, via the Panama Canal.

Following an extensive yard overhaul period to prepare her for further combat operations, on 21 November 1968 Newport News once again departed Norfolk to commence her second deployment to Vietnam. Combat operations during this second tour commenced on 25 December 1968, focused primarily on providing Naval Gunfire Support to the 7th and 9th ARVN in the Vinh Binh Province of the Mekong Delta and on providing additional Naval Gunfire Support near the DMZ. Newport News expended 18,928 rounds of ammunition during this second Vietnam deployment, departing Da Nang, South Vietnam on 3 June 1969, via San Francisco and the Panama Canal, to arrive at her homeport in Norfolk, Virginia in early July of that year.

In May 1972 Newport News returned to the gunline for her third combat tour in WESTPAC. During the summer of 1972 the ship, along with the guided missile cruisers USS Oklahoma City, and USS Providence (as well as several screening destroyers including the USS Hanson) took part in a high speed night bombardment of Haiphong harbor. Known as the Three Cruiser Raid, it was the last time a major shore bombardment would be undertaken by multiple large (cruiser sized) ships.

On 1 October 1972, while in action off the Demilitarized Zone in Vietnam, Newport News sustained an in-bore explosion in her center 8-inch gun of number two turret. A defective auxiliary detonating fuse caused the projectile to detonate almost immediately upon firing. Twenty men were killed and thirty six injured. The barrel proper was blown forward from the gun. The damaged gun was removed and its port plated over. The explosion had caused extensive damage to the center gun mount. There had been a complete spare gun assembly in the supply system but it had been scraped. It was proposed to replace the damaged mount with one from Des Moines (CA-134) or Salem (CA-139), who were decommissioned, but this was rejected as being too expensive. As a result, the damage was not repaired and the turret was simply closed off. The ship completed her career with the turret unusable and locked in train.

Operations near Vietnam continued until December 1972 when the ship was recalled to Norfolk. During 1973 and 1974 the ship undertook training cruises and visited many ports around the world before being recalled for decommissioning, after a survey to determine further service indicated the ship was beyond refitting.


USS Newport News (CA-148)

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 08/23/2017 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The Des Moines-class of heavy cruisers was developed by the United States Navy (USN) during World War 2 (1939-1945). They were a further evolution of the Oregon City-class which introduced a combination smoke funnel design and compact superstructure, both designed to improve firing arcs for the primary battery. The Des Moines-class took this further and brought along a fully-automatic main battery as well as cased ammunition (an improvement over the old shell-and-powder-bag system of old).

USS Newport News (CA-148) was part of the Des Moines-class which was originally set to number twelve total ships. However, the end of World War 2 in August of 1945 limited the group to just three - USS Des Moines, USS Salem and USS Newport News. While her sisters held services lives that ended after just a decade or so, USS Newport News sailed into the mid-1970s before being given up (though only USS Salem was preserved as a floating museum).

USS Newport News was laid down on November 1st, 1945 and launched on March 6th, 1948. She was commissioned on January 29th, 1949 with hull symbol CA-148. At the time of her commissioning, USS Newport News was the first USN warship to feature a full air-conditioning suite. She also became the final warship of the service to sport an all-gun armament scheme (the incorporation of missile-minded armament soon followed in warship design).

As built, the warship displaced around 20,000 tons. Her length was 717.5 feet with a beam of 76.5 feet and a draught of 27 feet. Power was from 4 x Babcock & Wilcox boiler units feeding 4 x General Electric turbines developing 120,000 horsepower and driving 4 x Shafts under stern. Maximum speed was 31.5 knots with a range out to 10,500 nautical miles.

The Des Moines-class was noted as being the ultimate incarnation of the conventionally-powered USN heavy cruiser of the World War 2 period. These were relatively fast ships with good armor protection and carried considerable firepower for the role. Should they have been pressed into service sooner, they no doubt would have had an impact on the fighting in the Pacific Theater against the Japanese.

Armament stood at the heart of any USN warship during the conflict and USS Newport News followed the same, proven armament scheme seen in other large vessels. Her primary battery encompassed 9 x 8" /55 caliber guns held in three triple-gunned turrets, two set forward at the forecastle and the remaining gun set aft nearer the stern. These were supported by 12 x 5" /38 caliber guns and 12 x 3" /50 caliber guns.

Like her sister USS Salem, USS Newport News traveled the Caribbean and Mediterranean waters during her early-going. She was a member of the 6th Fleet in the Atlantic which gave her access to vital waterways between the U.S. and Europe. She served during the Moroccan earthquake (in the humanitarian role), during the Dominican Crisis and in NATO RIPTIDE III during the early 1960s. In October of 1962, she was placed on high alert for the Cuban Missile Crisis.

During the 1950s, the vessel was outfitted with additional radar systems and improved both her gunnery and navigation suites. Her bridge was also reworked to now include a flag and navigation bridge. A deckhouse was added amidships in 1962 which allowed her to be used more effectively in the flagship role.

Her deployment to Vietnam waters began in October 1967 and ended in 1972. During this time, she served as flagship of ComCruDesFlot 3 and was used to shell enemy coastal and inland positions during Operation Sea Dragon. Patrols were a necessary part of this deployment in stemming the flow of goods by North Vietnam and acting as a deterrent to any large-scale land maneuvers within reach of her guns. Nearly 60,000 projectiles were fired by the ship in her early tours in the region.

She was overhauled in 1968 to prepare her for her next deployment to Vietnam. Again her guns were brought to bear on the enemy but by this time she was serving side-by-side with guided-missile cruisers - the future of the USN cruiser fleet. In October of 1972, a projectile in one of her guns detonated killing nineteen and injuring ten. This resulted in the turret being disabled for the remainder of her sailing career.

USS Newport News returned to Norfolk before 1973, concluding her tour in Vietnam waters. Several training initiatives and friendly port stops were had involving her during her later years. The warship was decommissioned on June 27th, 1975 and her name struck from the Naval Register in July of 1978. For a time she berthed alongside her sisters in reserve until, in February of 1993, she was sold for scrap.


USS Newport - History

USS Matsonia , a 13,500-ton (displacement) transport, was built in 1913 at Newport News, Virginia, as the civilian passenger steamship Matsonia . The Navy took her over in January 1918 and placed her in commission in March of that year. Prior to the 11 November 1918 Armistice, she made six round-trip voyages across the Atlantic, taking over 13,000 persons to the European war zone. After the end of the fighting, Matsonia returned more than 23,000 personnel to the U.S. in eight trips. She was decommissioned and returned to her owners in September 1919.

This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have concerning USS Matsonia (ID # 1589).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway at sea in 1918, while transporting 4800 American Soldiers from the U.S. to France for World War I service.
The original photograph was printed on post card stock.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2007.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 36KB 740 x 450 pixels

At Newport News, Virginia, circa early 1919.
Note the inscription on the postcard: "We took them over and will bring them back".

Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2008.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 83KB 740 x 480 pixels

Arriving in New York Harbor at the end of a voyage from Europe, 1919.
Note the crowd of troops on her deck.
The Statue of Liberty is in the left distance.
Photographed by E. Muller Jr., New York.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2007.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 84KB 900 x 565 pixels

Steams in a U.S. harbor, accompanied by tugs, circa 1919.
Probably photographed by E.P. Griffith, Newport News, Virginia.
Built in 1913, the passenger steamship Matsonia was acquired by the Navy on 22 January 1918 and commissioned as USS Matsonia on 1 March 1918. She was decommissioned in September 1919 and returned to her owners.

The original print is in National Archives' Record Group 19-LCM.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 51KB 740 x 530 pixels

Panoramic photograph of the ship in 1919.
Photographed from on board another U.S. Navy troop transport. Stack marking on the tug at right indicates that the view was taken as Matsonia was leaving St. Nazaire, France.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Lieutenant Charles Dutreaux.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 92KB 1200 x 400 pixels

In port during 1919, while employed transporting U.S. troops home from Europe.
The original image was printed on postal card ("AZO") stock.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2005.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 61KB 740 x 465 pixels

Troops Arriving at New York, 1919

View showing troops marching along a New York Harbor waterfront, immediately after their arrival home from France.
USS Matsonia (ID # 1589) is in the background.
These men are armed with M1917 rifles. Note the welcoming onlookers on both sides of the route.
Photograph printed on a stereograph card published by the Keystone View Company, circa 1919.

Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2008.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 143KB 650 x 675 pixels

A stereo pair version of this image is available as Photo # NH 106250-A
Online Image of stereo pair: 70KB 675 x 360 pixels

See Photo # NH 106250-B for a view of the card's reverse, featuring text concerning the welcomes received by troops arriving at New York after their World War I service.
Online Image of the card's reverse: 96KB 675 x 360 pixels

In port in 1919, while employed bringing troops home from Europe.
Location is probably Newport News, Virginia.

Donation of Captain Stephen S. Roberts, USNR (Retired), 2008.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 77KB 740 x 470 pixels

At Newport News, Virginia, on 16 July 1919, with the freshly landed American Expeditionary Force troops in the foreground.
This image is cropped from Photo # NH 106244.

Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2008.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 110KB 900 x 515 pixels

"Landing of A.E.F. Troops July 16th 1919 at Newport News Va. U.S.S. Matsonia "

Panoramic photograph by Holladay, Newport News, showing the freshly landed troops in the foreground. USS Matsonia (ID # 1589) is in the left background.

Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2008.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 169KB 2000 x 395 pixels

Cover of a "Souvenir Folder", published circa 1918-1919, that features ten halftone reproductions of photographs of and on board the ship. It was sent to Mrs. Lorcy Petrie, of 4309 North Lincoln Street, Chicago, Illinois, by Musician First Class H. Petrie, who was apparently a member of the ship's crew.
The individual photographs have Photo #s NH 103995, NH 103996, NH 103997, NH 103998, NH 103999, NH 104000, NH 104001, NH 104002, NH 104003, and NH 104004.


USS Newport - History


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Compare this LST model to similar ones made by other makers to see the reason model enthusiasts and collectors have recognized us a leader in model warships. Nobody else has produced a model that the ramp can be moved to different positions to reveal how the tanks come out from under the deck. No one else could offer tanks and vehicles on the model. If you want the best possible ship that will stay with you for many years and become a heirloom, we would be your natural choice. Please let us know of your interest here: commissioning.

Newport-class tank landing ships were employed by the United States Navy from 1969 to 2002. Because of the demand of the United States amphibious forces for higher speed that the traditional bow door form for LSTs would not be capable to deliver, the designers of the Newport class came up with a design of a traditional ship hull with a 112-foot aluminum ramp slung over the bow supported by two derrick arms. The new design allowed the larger ships run faster than any previous LST design, surpassing 20 knots.

The vessels were equipped with a stern gate to allow the unloading of amphibious vehicles directly into the water or to unload onto a utility landing craft or pier. At either end of the tank deck there is a 30 ft turntable that permits vehicles to turn around without having to reverse.

The Newport class has the capacity for 500 long tons of vehicles, 19,000 sq. ft. of cargo area and could carry up to 431 troops.



This model is 32" long when the ramp is extended, and 3o" when the ramp is towed. The total height is 11" and total width 6" (including the base's dimensions.) It was commissioned for a sailor who served on the LST-1183 in the Vietnam war.

$2,900 Shipping and insurance in the US included. Other countries : $200 flat rate.

Model is built per commission only. We require only a small deposit (not full amount, not even half) to start the process. $500 The remaining balance won't be due until the model is completed, in several months.


Watch the video: USS NEWPORT NEWS CA-148: FLAGSHIP WARRIOR