Were any congressmen or senators concerned that women's suffrage would result in anti-war votes?

Were any congressmen or senators concerned that women's suffrage would result in anti-war votes?

Suffragist organizations at the onset of WWI held varying views on the war. Carrie Chapman Catt of NAWSA felt that women would be viewed as reliable and patriotic if they supported the war effort. But Alice Paul of the NWP picketed outside the White House and publicly criticized Woodrow Wilson. Her actions were seen as unpatriotic and her picketers were often thrown in jail. The first female member of congress, Jeanette Rankin, voted against the declaration of war on Germany in 1917.

Are there instances (such as speeches or letters) where congressmen and senators expressed concern that, if enfranchised, women would vote in accordance with Alice Paul and Jeanette Rankin's anti-war views?

To find likely answers, I've been comparing a list of those members who voted in favor of the war, to those who voted against ratifying the 19th amendment in 1918. But it has been very slow going so I'm wondering if anyone happens to know this, or knows a better way to search for it.

There is a tally sheet for the House of Representatives, showing who voted in favor of the war declaration. But as of yet I have not found a similar list for the Senate, which voted 82-6 on April 4, 1917.


Watch the video: Η αναμέτρηση Κλίντον-Τραμπ και η ψήφος των γυναικών