Ibis II AM-134 - History

Ibis II AM-134 - History

Ibis II

( AM-134: dp. 590; 1. 147'; b. 26'; dr. 13'; s. 12
a. 2 6-pdr.)

The second Ibis (AM-134), a converted steel-hulled trawler, was built as Tide in 1937 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Co., Quincy, Mass, acquired from her owner, General Sea Foods Corp., of Boston, 1 January 1942; and commissioned 23 May 1942, Lt. F. G. Crane in command.

Ibis was assigned to Woods Hole Section Base, Mass., as a training ship until spring 1943, when she took up minesweeping duties out of Newport, R.I. She decommissioned 1 May 1944. Her name was struck from the Navy List 16 September 1944 and she transferred to the Maritime Commission. She was subsequently sold to General Foods Corp., Boston, Mass.


17 John Castellano Part II

Here’s how we portrayed the Szazbo in our 1997 catalog (one of our favorite catalogs). Click on the image to blow it up.

We did a comprehensive Szazbo brochure in 1995, and you can click on the image below for a nice, clean downloadable PDF (1.something megs).

For this second part, we’ll learn a bit—in John’s own words—about how he convinced Scot to go ahead and take a gamble on building the BowTi. Take it away John:

The BowTi, Born in Back of Behind

One day I got a call from Scot to drive out to the 24 Hours of Moab race. I had never been there, but Moab was mecca for mountain bikers. I thought about it for 1/4 second and said yes. There was only one thing—we couldn’t leave till late Friday, and the race started at noon on Saturday. So we loaded up bikes and camping gear into the trusty Mercedes wagon and headed out of Sebastopol about 4AM. This was in late October of 1995.

We were joined on this adventure by Matt Fitzgerald who was writing a story for MultiSport magazine. He was visiting Ibis, and heard about the 24 hour race, hence the surprise trip. This was in the days of big-rig race trucks from the big bike companies at the big XC races. Mountain bike racing was going corporate, but little, teeny Ibis was going to have some good racers in this one. We set out for Utah to find the true spirit of mountain biking, which we heard was going to make an appearance somewhere near Moab.

We caught Highway 50 outside of Fernley, Nevada around sunrise. Scot was in the back typing on his laptop, and glanced up at the speedo. “I think we’ll have to pick up the pace to make it by dark”. I did some quick calculations. Yup, we would. Highway 50 is known as “The Loneliest Road in America”. There are few cars and even fewer towns. The terrain here is “basin and range” with north-south ridges and big basins in between. When you come over a ridge, you can see the road ahead for miles and miles. Convenient when you’re playing “cops and speeders”.

The bikes we had in the back were the new Szazbo, Ibis’ first suspension bike and the first bike I designed from the ground up. The Szazbo had about twice as much travel as other bikes of the day, and it was exciting to bring them out to Moab’s hard-core terrain. I had an ulterior motive on this trip, though. I was already thinking about the next design. What I had in mind was a pivotless version of the Szazbo, codenamed Tiflex. I had a little brass model that you could push on. It moved up and down, but not sideways, the holy grail for bike frames. The tubes would bow into perfect little arcs.

I had shown it to Scot before, but I think he thought it was a crazy idea to get four-plus inches travel out of flexing titanium. Yet he was a big fan of Ti and its amazing properties. I figured I had him captive for 1000 miles each way, so I could work on convincing Scot. There’s one stretch of road after Eureka, NV, where it’s almost 100 miles to the next town of Ely. I think I talked the whole hour. When we got to Moab, after 14 hours of driving, I was starting to wear him down. I wanted him to think “maybe this could actually work”.

Moab is outside of Canyonlands National Park. My vision of Moab was a tiny town perched on top of a mesa, with Rim Cyclery overlooking the edge. Well it was a little bigger than that, being an old uranium mining town. And, of course, it was in a valley. The race course was beyond town, at an area called “Back of Behind”. Basically, you turn off on a dirt road, wander around a little while, then in the middle of nowhere there’s a couple of hundred tents and bikes with lights. The 24 Hours of Moab still had 18 hours to go.

If you’ve never been to a 24 hour race, it’s a cross between a race and a party. Everyone’s friendly and hard-core and hungry! We helped make dinner for the team and watched the racers leave trails of light in the desert. One problem that arose was that someone had stolen all our beer. Now good beer is hard to come by in Utah, so this was a BIG problem. The rumor was that Mike Ferrentino of Bike Magazine was stealing everybody’s beer. Once we made our way over to his camp and found the beer party, all was good again. We even learned the proper way to drink beer from a jug that weekend.

After a couple of hours of sleep, we got up in the middle of the night and headed to the start/finish area. There was a mellow vibe, punctuated by moments of frenzy as racers came in for the baton pass. I remember names like “Team Hugh Jass” and “Team DFL”. People were racing hard and having fun. It started snowing in the wee hours, the bike lights making a glowing halo around each rider. As we stood there, it became clear. We had found the true spirit of mountain lurking out there behind the rocks in the middle of the night.

After the race we got in some epic rides over the next few days. You can’t help it in Moab. Then on the way home to California, Scot surprisingly agreed we should make a prototype. Perhaps the spirits had inspired him with visions of bowing titanium, or maybe he said “yes” just so I wouldn’t bug him the whole 14 hours. Either way, it worked. Of course then I had to finish the design and do all the stress analysis. The first one was ready to ride in early ‘96, and we tested and tweaked all that year. It wasn’t really in Scot’s plan to bring out another suspension bike so soon after the first, but you do what you gotta do. However the BowTi may not have happened at all if we hadn’t gone to Moab and addressed the true spirits of mountain biking.

Ibis started making BowTis in ’97, and a lot of BowTis are still being ridden hard, almost 15 years later. I know, because I’ve had a good percentage of them in my shop to have a disc mount welded on. It’s amazing how beloved some of these bikes are. One guy says his BowTi has 40,000 miles and counting. I’m still making the occasional new BowTi too, with Steve Potts, but Ti has gotten so expensive its kind-of crazy. But, like I said, you do what you gotta do.

John Castellano, aka Mr Pivotless

Time for some photographic relief as this post has too many words! Here's John posing next to a BowTi, the fruit of many hundreds of hours o labor, and at least one trip to Moab. Who can name that fork? Head over to facebook.com/IbisBikes.


Ibis II AM-134 - History

This was the largest Army base in the world covering some 18,000 square miles. It stretched from the outskirts of Pomona, California eastward to within 50 miles of Phoenix, Arizona, southward to the suburbs of Yuma, Arizona and northward into the southern tip of Nevada. It existed primarily to train U.S. forces in desert warfare for the North African campaign.

Native Californian Major General George Smith Patton, Jr., commander of the I Armored Corps, was responsible for selecting this site in early 1942. As a native of southern California he knew the area well from his youth and from having participated in Army maneuvers here and in the Mojave Desert in the 1930s. Patton chose the small town of Desert Center, population 19, as his headquarters. At that time the training base was called "Desert Training Center" and had not yet reached it maximum size. Six months later it was given the CAMA name, and by November 1943, it had reached its maximum size after several expansions. Patton and his advanced team designated various locations within the area where tent camps would be built to house individual units. The camps were situated so that each unit could train individually without interfering with the other. Airfields, hospitals, supply depots and sites for other support services were selected as was a corps maneuvering area. The plan was that each division and or major unit would train in its own area, and near the end of its training period would participate in a corps (two divisions or more) exercise in the corps maneuvering area at Palen Pass. Upon completion of the corps exercise, the trained units would leave CAMA, and new units would arrive to begin their training and the process repeated.

The area chosen in the Mojave Desert was ultimately 350 miles wide and 250 miles deep. On 20 June 1942 the War Department acquired the land from the Department of the Interior by Public Land Order No. 1. The area included several sections in Riverside County, ranging from Indio, California to Arizona and from Las Vegas to Yuma. On May 12, 1942, by announcement of General Orders No. 7, the Desert Training Center was named Camp Young. On January 27, 1943, by announcement of General Orders No. 8, Camp Young "proper" (3,279.89 acres) became the Headquarters of the Desert Training Center/California-Arizona Maneuver Area (DTC/CAMA). By November 1943 CAMA had enlarged and included Camp Young, Camp Coxcomb, Camp Iron Mountain, Camp Granite, Camp Essex (later renamed Camp Clipper), Camp Ibis, Camp Hyder, Camp Horn, Camp Laguna, Camp Pilot Knob, Camp Bouse and several bombing and artillery ranges.

CAMA was divided into a Communication Zone and a Combat Zone. The Communications Zone surrounds and entirely encloses the Combat Zone. Those areas within the perimeter of the Communication Zone are not really maneuver areas. Camp Young was located outside the Combat Zone, within the Communication Zone (Desert Area Recreation Survey, Geography of Desert Training Center 1943).

General Patton, who was independently wealthy, purchased some commercial radio broadcasting equipment with his own funds and set up his own radio station within CAMA. The station broadcasted music and news most of the time except when Patton wanted to address the troops. He kept a microphone at his desk and another by his bed and broke into the programming whenever it suited him.

Patton's I Armored Corps trained here from April to August 1942 and then departed to participate in the invasion of North Africa which occurred in November 1942. As Patton and his.troops moved out, the II Armored Corps, under Major General Alvan Gillem, Jr., moved in. They trained at CAMA until October and their place was taken by the IV Armored Corps. They were followed in successive order by the IX Corps, XV Corps, IV Corps and X Corps.

When the Allied victory came in North Africa, the need for desert-trained units faded and in May 1944, CAMA was closed. Most of the sites can be visited, but some are difficult to reach. In most cases the only things that remain at the camp sites are streets, sidewalks, building foundations, patterns of hand-laid rocks for various purposes and trash dumps. Monuments have been erected at some of the camp sites and there are areas within CAMA that are fenced off with danger signs warning of unexploded ordnance. The following is a list of the California elements of CAMA.


A quick view of some samples of the diverse range of Royal Doulton Marks. Click an image to open the full Doulton marks section.

/> Doulton Lambeth /> Doulton Bunnykins /> Doulton Burslem /> Doulton Series Ware The Gleaners
/> Doulton Stoneware /> Doulton Lambeth Stoneware /> Doulton China /> Doulton Burslem
/> Doulton Series Ware /> Doulton Series ware Home Waters

Ibis II AM-134 - History

In late 1941, it was clear that the German military was overrunning Europe and that the United States' involvement was imminent. To train U.S. soldiers to fight the German Afrikakorps, 18,000 square miles in the southeastern California and western Arizona desert was selected to prepare the men on the hazards and difficulty in fighting a desert war. In early 1942, Patton said in a speech to his troops:

" The war in Europe is over for us. England will probably fall this year. Our first chance to get at the enemy will be in North Africa. We cannot train troops to fight in the desert of North Africa by training in the swamps of Georgia. I sent a report to Washington requesting a desert training center in California. The California desert can kill quicker than the enemy. We will lose a lot of men from the heat, but training will save hundreds of lives when we get into combat. I want every officer and section to start planning on moving all our troops by rail to California ."

The massive training area stretched from Indio eastward 150 miles to an area 60 miles west of Phoenix, and from Yuma northward 300 miles to Searchlight, Nevada.

The area was selected for a number of reasons

1. Over 98% of the land was state or federally owned (only 1.5% was held privately).

2. The land was remote and rugged, and largely uninhabited which made for an excellent large scale training area.

3. An existing aqueduct system (running from the Colorado River to Los Angeles) could easily supply the troops with water.

4. The terrain and weather resembled that found in North Africa.

5. The massive area was already supplied by three railroads that could be utilized by the Army to deliver daily rations- Union Pacific in the north, Santa Fe in the center portion, and Southern Pacific in the south.

Patton commanded the Desert Training Center from March-August, 1942, at which time he was dispatched to North Africa to fight the Germans. Afterwards, DTC was run under various commanders until its close in 1944.

The training ground was divided into three areas Maneuver Area "A" covered 10,200 miles in southeastern California and the southern tip of Nevada Area "B" covered 6,300 miles in western Arizona Area "C" covered an additional 1,500 square miles in northwestern Arizona.

Thirty miles east of Indio was Camp Young, the DTC's headquarters facility. Camp Young worked as the administrative camp and oversaw all the operations of the other divisional camps. The camps in California (Area A) are: Camp Coxcomb, Camp Iron Mountain, Camp Granite, Camp Rice, Camp Ibis, Camp Pilot Knob, Camp Essex and Camp Clipper.

Additionally, there were four airfields that gave air support to Army divisions within the Desert Training Center Rice Army Airfield, Blythe Army Airfield, Desert Center Army Airfield, and Thermal Army Airfield. These airfields flew reconnaissance and dive-bombing missions in coordination with Army divisions training at DTC.

The camps in Arizona (Area B) are Camp Hyder, Camp Horn, Camp Bouse and Camp Laguna.

There were also a number of Quartermaster Supply Depots and Railroad Sidings at Freda, Goffs, Cadiz, Danby, Fenner and Glamis in California, and at Araby, Dateland, Bouse, Wickenburg and Yuma in Arizona.

Most of the men who trained with their units prior to arriving at Desert Training Center had enjoyed running water, showers, and swamp-cooled barracks. However, the purpose at Desert Training Center was to introduce the men to the harsh desert conditions found in real combat. There was dust and dirt that made its way into every article of clothing, weapons and equipment. Aside from the snakes, scorpions and cactus, men had to endure the below-freezing winter temperatures as well as the sweltering 115 degree summer days.

The role of DTC was to train men in combat conditions. The majority of their time was spent in the field on maneuvers for days and weeks on end. The large size of the training area made it possible for the infantry and armor divisions at each camp to make 1-3 week long excursions into the desert using live ordinance (from small arms to heavy artillery and tank rounds) without the risk of running into each other. These long excursions were to simulate life at the front line, and the men were given a daily amount of water to drink, ate rations, slept in sleeping bags on the rocky desert floor, and were lucky to have enough water left over to wash their face.

Maneuvers typically consisted of divisions (roughly 15,000 men each in size) fighting each other in mock battles. Instead of utilizing paved public roads, few of which ran through the DTC area anyway, the infantry and armored divisions traveled overland, making their own roads and paths through the barren desert. Even though most of the remnants and debris left behind was cleaned up at war's end, today one can still see the traces of full divisions moving over the desert in the forms of tank tracks, food cans, gas and oil cans, glass bottles, brass shell casings, etc. In the areas of mock battles one can still see foxholes, rock embankments, trenches and concrete bunkers.

A typical training schedule for a division was:

Week 1 -individual and squad training.

Week 2 -company or battery training

Week 3 -battalion training

Week 4 -regimental training

Weeks 5--7 -divisional field exercises

Weeks 8-13 -corps maneuvers

At any given time there were approximately 180,000 soldiers training at the various camps during their 3-4 month training. There were over 38,000 vehicles jeeps, trucks, half-tracks and tanks. Each division's mechanics was responsible for the maintenance of the vehicles and when that division left, the vehicles were then passed off to the new division arriving at camp. By the time the DTC drew to a close, most were in deplorable condition.

After the German defeat in North Africa in May 1943, desert training was no longer a necessity as combat moved onto the European continent. As a result, all of the camps were closed by April, 1944. Once closed, Army Quartermaster units were sent in to dismantle the tents and other camp fixtures, and to clean up the left behind trash and debris. All of the equipment and vehicles were then loaded onto trains and taken away.

Of the 87 divisions the Army formed during WWII, 20 divisions (13 infantry and 7 armored) trained at Desert Training Center.


Early history

Under the leadership of William C. Durant, the General Motors Company was founded in 1908 to consolidate several motorcar companies producing Buick, Oldsmobile, Cadillac, Oakland (later Pontiac), Ewing, Marquette, and other autos as well as Reliance and Rapid trucks. GM introduced the electric self-starter commercially in its 1912 Cadillac, and this invention soon made the hand crank obsolete. GM remained based in Detroit and was reincorporated and named General Motors Corporation in 1916. The Chevrolet auto company and Delco Products joined GM in 1918, and the Fisher Body Company and Frigidaire joined in 1919 (the latter was sold in 1979).

Durant was forced out of the company in 1920 and was succeeded by Alfred P. Sloan, Jr., who served as president (1923–37) and then as chairman of the board of directors (1937–56). Sloan reorganized GM from a sprawling, uncoordinated collection of business units into a single enterprise consisting of five main automotive divisions—Cadillac, Buick, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, and Chevrolet—the activities of which were coordinated by a central corporate office equipped with large advisory and financial staffs. The various operating divisions retained a substantial degree of autonomy within a framework of overall policy this decentralized concept of management became a model for large-scale industrial enterprises in the United States. Sloan also greatly strengthened GM’s sales organization, pioneered annual style changes in car models, and introduced innovations in consumer financing.


The Train

This restored 1920s train has sheltered royalty and been a star of the silver screen. Each whimsically-named carriage has a story to tell. Explore Audrey, Vera, Minerva and more to discover their distinctive personalities.

Delight in antique-style marquetry, vintage lighting and heritage upholstery—our passion for preserving history is evident at every turn.

Audrey

Damaged in 1940 by air raid at Victoria Station, repaired and rejoined Brighton Belle in 1947. Carried the Queen, the Queen Mother and H.R.H. Prince Philip the Duke of Edinburgh to review the Fleet in 1953. Transported the Queen on her visit to Sussex University 1964.

Cygnus

Used in the special Festival of Britain rake in 1951. Reserved for use by Royalty and visiting Heads of State. Made last journey of Golden Arrow 1972. Featured in the film ‘Agatha’ with Vanessa Redgrave and Dustin Hoffman.

In 1948 was used, with sister car Mona, to convey H.M. Queen Elizabeth (later the Queen Mother) to Brighton. Brighton Belle service withdrawn in 1972. Preserved as a restaurant at The Horseless Carriage, Chingford, Essex, and later at the Colne Valley Railway, Castle Hedingham, Essex.

1925 by Birmingham Railway Carriage & Wagon Co. Sold to La Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits et des Grands Express Européens for service in Italy. History: Purchased by the Pullman Car Company Ltd. in 1928 and returned to Britain for Golden Arrow service. Entered Cunard boat train service between Victoria and Southampton 1952. Retired 1968.

Built in 1928 as a First Class kitchen car. Served on Ocean Liner services and Bournemouth Belle until 1939. Later ran on Queen of Scots, Golden Arrow, Yorkshire Pullman, South of Wales Pullman and the high speed Talisman route before retiring in 1968.

Lucille

Built in 1928 as a First Class parlour car for the Queen of Scots Pullman. Transferred to Southern Region in 1963 and ran in Bournemouth Belle until 1967. Preserved by Mr E. Lewis-Evans at the South Eastern Steam Centre, Ashford until 1984.

Minerva

Built in 1927 and served many Pullman routes. Joined the Devon Belle in 1947 and the Golden Arrow in 1951, being used in the special Festival of Britain rake. Often included in special trains for state visits and royal use in the early 50s.

Perseus

Designed in the 30s but not completed until 1951. Used in the special Festival of Britain rake as part of the Golden Arrow service. Formed part of Winston Churchill’s funeral train in 1965. Part of the last journey of the Golden Arrow in 1972.

Phoenix

Favourite carriage of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother: used by General de Gaulle and visiting Heads of State made last journey of Golden Arrow 1972. Became stationary restaurant in Lyon, France 1973.

Vera was directly hit in an air raid at Victoria Station in 1940. Roof extensively repaired, she rejoined Brighton Belle in 1947. Used by Royalty to review the Fleet in 1953 and for Prince Charles’ and Princess Anne’s first trip on an electric train in 1954. Brighton Belle service withdrawn in 1972. Preserved as a garden house in Suffolk.

Built in 1928 as a First Class parlour car. After the war, she joined Queen of Scots and Yorkshire Pullman until 1955, and then the Golden Arrow until 1960. Retired in 1965 as part of the final run of the Tees-Tyne Pullman.

Audrey

Damaged in 1940 by air raid at Victoria Station, repaired and rejoined Brighton Belle in 1947. Carried the Queen, the Queen Mother and H.R.H. Prince Philip the Duke of Edinburgh to review the Fleet in 1953. Transported the Queen on her visit to Sussex University 1964.

Cygnus

Used in the special Festival of Britain rake in 1951. Reserved for use by Royalty and visiting Heads of State. Made last journey of Golden Arrow 1972. Featured in the film ‘Agatha’ with Vanessa Redgrave and Dustin Hoffman.

In 1948 was used, with sister car Mona, to convey H.M. Queen Elizabeth (later the Queen Mother) to Brighton. Brighton Belle service withdrawn in 1972. Preserved as a restaurant at The Horseless Carriage, Chingford, Essex, and later at the Colne Valley Railway, Castle Hedingham, Essex.

1925 by Birmingham Railway Carriage & Wagon Co. Sold to La Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits et des Grands Express Européens for service in Italy. History: Purchased by the Pullman Car Company Ltd. in 1928 and returned to Britain for Golden Arrow service. Entered Cunard boat train service between Victoria and Southampton 1952. Retired 1968.

Built in 1928 as a First Class kitchen car. Served on Ocean Liner services and Bournemouth Belle until 1939. Later ran on Queen of Scots, Golden Arrow, Yorkshire Pullman, South of Wales Pullman and the high speed Talisman route before retiring in 1968.

Lucille

Built in 1928 as a First Class parlour car for the Queen of Scots Pullman. Transferred to Southern Region in 1963 and ran in Bournemouth Belle until 1967. Preserved by Mr E. Lewis-Evans at the South Eastern Steam Centre, Ashford until 1984.

Minerva

Built in 1927 and served many Pullman routes. Joined the Devon Belle in 1947 and the Golden Arrow in 1951, being used in the special Festival of Britain rake. Often included in special trains for state visits and royal use in the early 50s.

Perseus

Designed in the 30s but not completed until 1951. Used in the special Festival of Britain rake as part of the Golden Arrow service. Formed part of Winston Churchill’s funeral train in 1965. Part of the last journey of the Golden Arrow in 1972.

Phoenix

Favourite carriage of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother: used by General de Gaulle and visiting Heads of State made last journey of Golden Arrow 1972. Became stationary restaurant in Lyon, France 1973.

Vera was directly hit in an air raid at Victoria Station in 1940. Roof extensively repaired, she rejoined Brighton Belle in 1947. Used by Royalty to review the Fleet in 1953 and for Prince Charles’ and Princess Anne’s first trip on an electric train in 1954. Brighton Belle service withdrawn in 1972. Preserved as a garden house in Suffolk.

Built in 1928 as a First Class parlour car. After the war, she joined Queen of Scots and Yorkshire Pullman until 1955, and then the Golden Arrow until 1960. Retired in 1965 as part of the final run of the Tees-Tyne Pullman.

Sensational Destinations

Vibrant cities, ancient castles, stately homes and celebrated sporting events. When you step aboard Belmond British Pullman, there's a whole world of possible destinations. Discover the historic gems of Bath, York or Canterbury. Feel like royalty as you explore Blenheim Palace or Sandringham. Feel the buzz at key calendar moments, such as the Chelsea Flower Show and Royal Ascot. Wherever you go, you'll start and end your day in style aboard our vintage carriages.

Unforgettable Experiences

Anticipate a day of lifelong memories without ever leaving the train. Spoil someone special with a classic Afternoon Tea or signature Golden Age of Travel lunch. Dress to impress and step aboard for a glamorous dinner with a renowned celebrity chef. Sleuth your way through a cast of unforgettable characters on an exciting Murder Mystery trip. Soak up the timeless atmosphere and raise a toast as you set off on a round-trip through the beautiful Kentish countryside.

Have a question? We'll help you find an answer.


Ibis II AM-134 - History

FELLOW IBISIANS!

Despite the fact that we are shipping record numbers of bikes, order volume has far outpaced our capacity to immediately fill these orders. We've also seen some disruptions in our supply chain due to COVID-19. Dealers all over the world are experiencing huge order quantities and their assembly processes has also been affected.

As a result, average lead times to get you riding you new bike have increased dramatically, expect at least a month on in-stock frames. To check on the status of your bike order, best to check with your retailer.

Now, back to our regularly scheduled note.

Ibis frames and complete bikes are available from retailers all over the world.

For the US and Canada, head on over to the 'find a dealer' page and enter your zip code (or allow your browser to know your location) to find your closest retailer. If there's no one close, we have several options for authorized online sellers.

For international inquiries, type in the name of your country and if we have a distributor there, their name will pop up. If you don't have a distributor in your country, feel free to call us or contact us via email at [email protected] and we'll find a way for you to swing your leg over an Ibis.

Note that we do not sell our bikes directly to consumers. We sell through retailers only.


What's new and how it compares

Most of the features on the X-S10 are well-established at this point, so in this section we're going to focus on a few things on this camera that you won't find on other Fujifilm models.

New IBIS unit

Being a smaller camera, it's no surprise that the X-T4's IBIS unit wasn't going to fit into the X-S10. So, the company designed a new one that is 30% smaller and lighter than the X-T4's. A new motion sensor makes the unit more efficient, and the X-S10 has a redesigned circuit board that reduces power consumption.

There's a very small difference in stabilization performance on the X-S10 versus the X-T4: just half a stop. It offers 6 stops of shake reduction on all unstabilized Fujifilm lenses save for the XF 16-55mm F2.8, which weighs in at 5.5 stops. Most stabilized Fujifilm lenses vary from 5.5 to 6 stops, save for the XF 80mm macro, which offers 5 stops. These differences primarily have to do with how much coverage the lens offers outside the sensor area, not necessarily whether the lenses have their own stabilization.

Refined auto and scene modes

Those who stick to auto and scene modes will gain a few new features. The X-S10 now has an 'auto' Film Simulation mode which will select between Provia (Standard), Velvia (Vivid) and Astia (Soft) depending on the scene. (Users can still manually select any of the Film Simulation modes offered.) In our testing, the camera seemed to err on the side of selecting Provia, at least with portrait shooting.

Photograph taken on a pre-production camera.

ISO 160 | 1/320 sec | F5.6 | XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 @ 55mm (82.5mm equiv.)
Photo by Jeff Keller

Befitting its mid-range (or 'more photographer friendly') status, you can now use any AF area mode in Auto or Scene modes, from spot to zone to wide/tracking. Previous cameras were locked in the 'wide' mode.

Lastly, Raw shooting is now available in these modes, rather than the photographer being 'stuck' with JPEG.

New joystick functionality

The joystick (officially known as the 'focus lever') works a bit differently on the X-S10 than on other Fujifilm models. Now, when you press it inward, it 'punches in' to the selected focus point. The clickable rear dials on other Fujifilm models operated this way by default. Simply nudging the stick in any direction allows you to select the focus point, and you can also use the dials to select the focus area mode (single-point, zone, wide/tracking).

You can change the functions of the joystick to a limited extent. Pushing the joystick straight inward will allow you to change the focus area instead of punching in (or you can assign it to do nothing), while nudging it in a direction can only adjust the focus point's size and position (rather than also allowing you to change the focus mode with the dials).

It can also be assigned to switch between detected faces in a scene if you enable this capability in the menus. It can be found as 'Setup -> Button/dial setting -> Focus lever setting'. For 'tilt,' we recommend placing it in Direct AF Point Selection / Face select.' If you don't want the camera to be preoccupied with faces in a scene, you simply press in on the joystick, and you can go back to picking your AF area yourself.

Unfortunately, the X-S10 doesn't remember whether you've opted out of the face selection mode in favor of selecting your own point after a power cycle. You'll need to push the joystick in each time you start up the camera to get out of face selection mode. Still, we like the ability to have all of this available from the AF joystick, instead of requiring a custom button for 'Face Selection' as we've seen on previous Fujifilm cameras.

Updated Film Simulation mode interface

Now, when you switch Film Simulation modes, which you can do using the top-left dial or the menus, you can press the Q button to see a description of what each mode does, along with an image resembling a classic film box.

Compared to.

The closest competitors to the X-S10 in our opinion are the Nikon Z50, Olympus OM-D E-M5 III and Sony a6600. The Nikon is a bit cheaper, but lacks the in-body image stabilization of the X-S10, E-M5 III and a6600. It's also worth pointing out that the Olympus and Sony cost a few hundred dollars more than the Fujifilm. (Sony offers the a6400 for less, although again it doesn't have stabilization.)

Fujifilm X-S10 Nikon Z50 Olympus E-M5 III Sony a6600
MSRP (body) $999 $859 $1199 $1399
Sensor res. 26MP X-Trans 21MP 20MP 24MP
Sensor size APS-C APS-C Micro 4/3 APS-C
Image stab. In-body Lens only In-body In-body
LCD type Fully articulating Tilting Fully articulating Tilting
LCD size/res 3.0" / 1.04M-dot 3.2" / 1.04M-dot 3.0" / 1.04M-dot 3.0" / 921k-dot
EVF res / mag
(equiv.)
2.36M-dot
0.62x
2.36M-dot
0.68x
2.36M-dot
0.68x
2.36M-dot
0.71x
Built-in flash Yes Yes No No
Burst w/AF 20 fps 11 fps 10 fps 11 fps
Video res. 4K/30p 4K/30p 4K/30p 4K/30p
(1.23x crop)
Log F-Log
(8-bit internal, 10-bit over HDMI)
No OM-Log
(8-bit)
S-Log
(8-bit)
Mic / headphone socket Yes / Yes (with adapter) Yes / No Yes / No Yes / Yes
SD card speed UHS-I UHS-I UHS-II UHS-I
Battery life (LCD) 325 shots 320 shots 310 shots 810 shots
Weight 465g (16.4oz) 450g (15.9oz) 414g (14.6oz) 503g (17.8oz)

Syllabus outline

Prescribed subjects

1. Military leaders
2. Conquest and its impact
3. The move to global war
4. Rights and protest
5. Conflict and intervention

1. Society and economy (750-1400)
2. Causes and effects of wars (750-1500)
3. Dynasties and rulers (750-1500)
4. Societies in transition (1400-1700)
5. Early Modern states (1450-1789)
6. Causes and effects of Early Modern wars (1500-1750)
7. Origins, development and impact of industrialization (1750-2005)
8. Independence movements (1800-2000)
9. Emergence and development of democratic states (1848-2000)
10. Authoritarian states (20 th century)
11. Causes and effects of 20 th -century wars
12. The Cold War: superpower tensions and rivalries (20 th century)


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