Medieval wonders and clues to the tragedy of the Red Lion pub in Canterbury uncover

Medieval wonders and clues to the tragedy of the Red Lion pub in Canterbury uncover

An archaeological dig has uncovered medieval wonders and many clues to one of Canterbury's great tragedies during World War II.

A team from the Canterbury Archaeological Foundation has discovered a strange vessel sealed in clay soil, tiles, nails, ceramics and a part of a clay pipe, hidden under buildings from the 19th and 19th centuries. It has even been unearthed a signal counter, created by a man named Hans Krauwinckel in Germany, used by merchants instead of coins, which were minted between 1586 and 1635.

However, the most exciting thing they have found is something contemporary, the ruins of the Red Lion Pub, which was flown in WWII when a bomb dropped by the German Luftwaffe parachuted into a parachute on November 18, 1944.

The Foundation has started discussions with the Canterbury City Council, which plans to build new houses in the region, in order to erect a memorial to honor those who died at the site.

Site supervisor Ross Lane said that “the excavation has given archaeologists the rare opportunity to observe the origins of Sturry and follow the building development in the center of this historic town”.

Source: This is Kent

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