Archaeological excavations have been completed in Ayia Varvara, Cyprus

Archaeological excavations have been completed in Ayia Varvara, Cyprus

Excavations at the Ayia Varvara-Asprokremnos site in Cyprus have been completed by 2011, according to an announcement made by the Department of Antiquities of the Ministry of Communications and Public Works.

All the research was directed by Dr. Carloe McCartney and they were part of the development of the first Neolithic projects in the country.

Ayia Varvara-Asprokremnos, It is assumed that it was occupied at the beginning of the Neolithic period, from which data on the resources and manufacturing activity that took place were also obtained, in a very small but highly populated site.

This year's excavations were aimed at providing much more evidence of manufacturing activity, related to the production of stone tools, many of them used for hunting, their main mode of subsistence, finding notches and scrapers that were used not only for the creation of tools, but also of various objects.

Its ability to select extreme quality stones to create its tools stands out from this civilization.

The very location of the site had already given indications about the type of manufacture that they owned, as well as that they were hunters by nature. This year's excavations were marked by the colors (red, orange, yellow, ocher, etc.), as well as stones used as anvils. This type of mineral was already known to be used by the ancient inhabitants of the region for the creation of stone tools.

Source: Greek Reporter
Image: Santorini Eruption Org

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