Engraved stelae found at Tel El-Dafna, a site in Egypt

Engraved stelae found at Tel El-Dafna, a site in Egypt

Archaeologists working at the Tel El-Dafna site in Ismailia (Egypt), came across what is believed to be a religious stele belonging to the 26th Dynasty, that of Wah-Ib-Re. The stele is engraved in hieroglyphics but it has been broken into two parts, one 163 cm high and the other 86 cm. The base of the stele has also been discovered.

Mohamed Abdel Maqsoud, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA), explained that such a style of stelae was well known in Greco-Roman times and they were called Apris and Hofra in the sacred texts.

He added that the excavation work carried out at Tel El-Dafna in the last three years revealed that the site was not only a military settlement of Greek mercenaries, but an urban Egyptian settlement built by King Psammetico I early in the 26th Dynasty.

Maqsoud pointed out that in the department stores that were found on the east and south sides of the east, they were filled with clay pots in the shape of the god Bes, and in addition, others imported from Cyprus were found, which indicates the good commercial relations between Greece and Egypt at that time.

In addition, in the site you can see kilns and handicraft tools, as well as a large temple.

Source: Ahram Online

After studying History at the University and after many previous tests, Red Historia was born, a project that emerged as a means of dissemination where you can find the most important news of archeology, history and humanities, as well as articles of interest, curiosities and much more. In short, a meeting point for everyone where they can share information and continue learning.


Video: Most MYSTERIOUS Discoveries Made In Egypt!