Germany refuses to return Nefertiti's bust once again

Germany refuses to return Nefertiti's bust once again

A new obstacle appeared for Egypt in its attempt to recover one of its most precious antiques, when Germany again refused to return the famous Nefertiti bust, which is currently in the Neues Museum in Berlin for decades.

The bust of Queen NefertitiThe 3,300-year-old is at the top of the long list of treasured objects that Egypt wants to return to its country, which, remember, was stolen in 1913 through the use of illegal documents.

Germany for its part, maintains that he acquired the bust through legal channels and that belongs to them. It is further argued that the object is too fragile to travel, so even a temporary loan to Egypt would not be possible.

The object request is part of an ongoing campaign by the Head of the Supreme Council of Antiquities of Egypt, Zahi, Hawass, who in the same launched requests for return to several countries of the world asking for more than 5,000 treasured objects, being the Nefertiti bust, one of the most precious.

Hawass He began to reintegrate Egyptian antiquities to his country in 2002, having great success with several museums around the world. In fact, two museums are being built to display all these works, the most notable being the Great museum, which will be located next to Pyramids of giza, whose completion is scheduled for next year.

Another great request is the Rosetta stone, which is housed in the British Museum today, as he also spoke to several high-profile officials from great museums around the world containing Egyptian antiquities, such as the Louvre Museum in Paris.

Egypt asked for the first time the return of the Nefertiti bust to Germany in the 1940s, but was quickly denied. Hawass initiated the request for application in the mentioned year, rekindling the debate between the two nations over the object.

Until now, the Neues Museum stands firm, both in affirming that the property was acquired legally and in denying its return. Hawass for his part has promised to fight tirelessly to get it back, but also has admitted that he has no legal recourse in order to go beyond formal requests.

Source: Yahoo! News

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