They discover the work of Caravaggio

They discover the work of Caravaggio

London art historian and salesman Clovis whitfield, it states having identified a painting by Caravaggio from the beginning of the 17th century. This painting, previously classified as an "unknown" author, comes from a private collection and is reproduced for the first time in an upcoming book about the master.

According to The Guardian, the Director of the Cleveland Museum of Art and co-author of the book said that the work “shows a Caravaggio face that is perhaps not as drastic and antagonistic as we are used to", And added that"maybe that's why it hadn't been recognized”.

Caravaggio's paintings are known for their original use of lighting, live models and their execution without the use of sketches. His work remains enormously influential to this day, and even a relatively low-key work like “San Agustin” (the painting found) has sparked great interest.

Sebastian Schütze, Professor of Art History at the University of Vienna or another of the book's co-authors, spoke about the importance of the discovery: “what appeared to be an anonymous from the 17th century, reveals his artistic qualities after restoration”.

The painting can be seen in the exhibition "Caravaggio and his followers in Rome", an exhibition that will run until September 11 at the National Gallery of Canada and where they gather in addition to this novelty, a dozen of the artist's masterpieces along with more than 40 paintings by other artists who sought inspiration in him, such as Peter Paul Rubens, Simon de Vouet, Jusepe de Ribera, Valentín de Boulogne or Orazio Gentileschi.

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Video: The Followers of Caravaggio. Beyond Caravaggio. National Gallery